ADVICE TO PILOTS

 

Before flying

Find out the day’s weather and its evolution.

Check the local weather stations.

Ask the locals or check the Pennine twitter or Facebook pages

Tell someone of your flying plans, launching area and proposed flight path.

Keep a copy of the air ambulance number and potential retrieve pilots mobile numbers in your flight deck at all times.

Keep a spare phone or phone battery for your flight deck in case yours goes flat.

 

Raising the alarm

Call the air ambulance number direct if you have it in your flight deck/phone

Or call 999 ask for the air ambulance

 

Be ready to answer the rescue service’s questions

Who are you?

Where are you (location, altitude, GPS coordinates)?

What has happened, when?

What is the wing’s colour?

What is the nature of any injuries?

What are the weather conditions?

Stay contactable by telephone

 

When the helicopter is approaching

Help the rescue teams complete their mission safely.

Stay contactable by telephone.

 

If flying, clear the helicopter’s activity area.

Secure the zone, stop take offs

Pack and remove the gear.

Put it out of the helicopter’s down draft.

Evacuate the operation zone.

Organise a large security perimeter.

Clear the public from the zone.

 

You are tree’d or on a cliff

Secure yourself, attach yourself solidly (see the personal security kit).

If you have a reserve chute, tell the rescue team.

If you are not completely sure of yourself, don’t climb down alone.

 

You are on a power line

Indicate the fact, the rescue team will proceed once the current has been cut.

Avoid all manoeuvres that could cause an electric arc.

Do what the rescue team tells you. Keep away from the power lines.

Hitting a pylon doesn’t only happen to other people.

 

DON’T TAKE OFF DURING THE WHOLE PERIOD THE HELECOPTER IS OPERATING IN THE ZONE.

A rescue can take an hour to an hour and a half, several trips may be necessary.

 

Even when there are no injuries, inform the rescue services of anything relevant (eg. a wing left behind…)

Avoid having the rescue services called out for a wing in the trees when you have already left the scene by your own means.

 

REMEMBER : A WING IN THE TREES CAN CAUSE MANY 999 EMERGENCY CALLS.

If you are OK, tell 999. Say if your wing has been left in the area and indicate its colour.

Recover your wing as soon as possible, and again inform 999.

 

AWAY FROM A TAKE OFF, A WING LEFT UNFOLDED FOR A WHILE MAY BE CONSIDERED A DISTRESS SIGNAL.

 

Recommended personal security kit

Line cutter

Long duration glow stick

Pen distress rocket

Whistle

Signalling mirror

Attachment sling to secure position

Haemostatic bandage

20 to 25 metres of cord

 

Conventional distress signals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thumbs up...                                                                 Both hands up... 

 I am ok, I don't need help.­                                           yes please help me!

 

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